Saturday, September 8, 2007

Why do Teenagers Blog?

There have been discussions on why old people need to blog on Mysore Blog Park recently, something which I am keenly following. I have read about the eldest blogger on Mr. GVK’s blog and how blogging can improve one’s health in Mr. Tharakan’s blog. It all sounds intriguing. Let me look at the other side of things…why do teenagers blog? Firstly, it does seem to be strange…teenagers can be easily defined in terms of TV, Barbarism, fashion, rock music and slang words. But serious writing? Nah, that is quite hard to imagine. You might think, being the computer whizzes we are, we use blogs as online diaries. Maybe you are right. If you observe the ‘teenage’ blogs, you can see we usually write about ourselves. We are those struggling souls, caught between childhood and adulthood, struggling on a path of self-discovery. That’s why we need a blog. We need to voice ourselves, it gives immense relief.

Teenagers can be unusual bloggers. All of us simply don’t use blogs as our personal journals. For some people like me, it all has a deeper meaning. There are actually a group of people who are out to prove that teenagers are not careless bloggers. That includes me. We can be serious writers, logical and profound thinkers, touchy, sentimental, we know we are capable of spreading awareness through blogs and online articles, some of us can understand adults, we can have a philosophical inclination too, at times. All of us are not those brainless chaps who only care about junk food and don’t know respect. We do. We too can be humane. Although today’s teenagers seem to be synonymous with wild and barbaric, try to look inside. You’ll see half of childhood innocence, and the maturity and strength of a growing mind. You’ll see a confused brain…a mixture of delicate thoughts which need assortment….there is also the pressure of dealing with things, of proving yourself, look deeper and you’ll see we are not at all as complex as we seem.

I have met some talented teenagers on blogpark, and I think I should introduce them to you. If you can read Telagu, you should go through the local magazine called Eenadu, it talks about a thirteen-year old blogger and magazine editor named Shambavi. If you cannot read Telagu, you should buy a recent copy of Tinkle and go through the Tinkle Times column. Shambavi is very talented. She’s on blogspot at www.invincible-themag.blogspot.com. She edits a children’s mag called ‘Invincible’ and she gives useful tips about studying, and keeping cool about it. That’s the sort of advise people like me need. She even wrote about our former president Abdul Kalaam and he was so pleased that she was invited to meet him!

Another active writer is my dearest friend, Deepti. She too is thirteen, and although she only recently took to blogging, she has enormous talent, and has written a large number of essays. You shall be baffled if you do read them (Deepti is shy in revealing her written works, and basically uncomfortable with others going through her works), but her writings reflect the thoughts of a mature person, there is underlying philosophy and a rich understanding of how life works. Something which is hard for even me to digest. Her essay named ‘Another Day in Paradise’ needs to be read and promoted, and Deepti has promised to blog it next. Although she has found time to only blog a single poem on her blog http://www.deeptiraghuram.blogspot.com/ , I ask you to go through it, you’ll understand what I mean.
So you see, people who want to write always will, immaterial of weather they are thirteen or thirty year old’s. And some people need to understand that even that wild creature of a teenager who irritates you with his weird ways and repulsive looks does have a heart…perhaps, if he starts writing, he’ll be able to prove that even he does possess talent, a skill, and the urge to prove himself.

10 comments:

narendra shenoy said...

The angst of being a teenager has been well documented in the US. There are movies, books, TV programs, god knows what else but in India it seems to be pretty much ignored.

The reason for the angst seems to be mostly physiological. All those hormones sloshing about, not to mention the zits that begin to dot the facial landscape like so many Mount Fujis. A teenager can go through more emotional flip flops in a day than a middle aged person might in an entire year.

Indian teenagers, then, must be going through much the same as the American ones. Yet there has been precious little discussion about it, or a forum for its expression.

Blogging seems to be the answer. You have put it beautifully. Yes, beneath the mindless rebellion is sensitivity, understanding and depth of feeling.

I had forgotten what it was like being a teenager. Your article refreshed some memories. Hey, Thanks!

diyadear said...

lakshmi,
tahnk u for poppin in at my place.. its really gr8 that u've taken up bloging seriously.. its nice to know wat young adults think and write abt. n i cudnt get to ur friend deepti's blog as it says the blog doesnt exist

Lakshmi Bharadwaj said...

Yes...diya mam, that was my mistake. I don't know how to link. I searched the 'blog help' thing, but it wouldn't work. Can someone please teach me how to connect to other people's blog? If you really want to read Deepti, pl. be sweet enough to copy that out, type it in again, and you'll see.

Lakshmi Bharadwaj said...

Mr. Shenoy,
You are right (no, I am not continuing to flatter you, nor am I thinking of your will!), the Indain teenagers are not too different from the american ones and you'll know, if you'll drop by on any school. They act the same, speak the same way, wear the same sort of cloths...everything is more american. Have a teenage son? If so, you'll already have understood.

Maddy said...

well, well lakshmi - that was a neat exposition of thoughts...I agree that while blogs started as personal journals and are defined so by many, it has blossomed into a channel for thoughts and to a certain extent an avenue for self publishing!!

Mysore Madhu said...

I had aspirations of becoming a journalist. I had even joined the Masters Degree in Journalism - which I unfortunately could not complete. This is now an opportunity to put my writing skills to test. Although my exposure to current affairs is only in the past tense, the extensive fun we had during my childhood days is giving me enough material to put in a sort of autobiography through blogging

Mohammed Musthafa said...

Hey...came across ur blog through Google Search for Indian Teenage bloggers....true...i agree with everything that you've said. In fact, from where I come from, teenagers actively read blogs as well. Though most of them dont have the habit of commenting on it! which upsets bloggers like me!

If possible, take a look at my blog. Would like to know your opinion abt which kind of a teenager i am: barbaric, or understanding!

http://www.laptopdiary.blogspot.com/2008/11/think-of-ajay.html

Emily said...

This really expresses how I feel about writing in general, and why I want to start a blog. The way I feel not is not compatible with the images I had of teenagers when I was younger. Oddly enough, I feel like the only one my age who thinks deep things and struggles with important questions. I've tried my hand at speaking, with disastrous results. The very fact that we are trying to develop a voice in a world that doesn't want to listen draws us to a blog, where all are equal if they can communicate clearly. So, as teens, let's show the world that we go beyond the angst, and touch on the same problems as those older than us.

Lakshmi Bharadwaj said...

Maddy and Madhu sir, thanks so much for the comments.
And mustafa: :) thanks for this little post it note. You know how huge a fan of laptop dairy I am now, and how we're friended and all and actually have a a couple of common friends. :) this was the post that changed everything. :) amazing writer u've remained.
Emily: thanks for visiting the blog. really means much to me. and yes, we need to change all that. It's six months since I've been 20, and have bid goodbye to my teenage...a lot of things have changed. but one thing always remains the same--its the memory of what teenage meant to me: how it shaped me as a blogger and writer. I'll never forget that...and i'm still not forgetting that.
glad that you think the exact same way I do. :)
welcome to my blog. if you do own one, plese do let me know! cheers and happy writing!

cbaileypappas said...

I am a teenager and I blog- Love blogging ;-)